Jeff Owens has a new church!

Ransom

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It is estimated that nearly 300,000 people have been saved thus far during the course of this man’s 42 year ministry.
You'll probably find them worshipping at whatever IFB church Jack Hyles' million converts are members at.
 

tmjbog

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You'll probably find them worshipping at whatever IFB church Jack Hyles' million converts are members at.
It does seem strange 300K converts and what size is his church? Maybe 600? Why do almost none of these converts go to his church?
 

Ransom

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It does seem strange 300K converts and what size is his church? Maybe 600? Why do almost none of these converts go to his church?
These "soulwinners" are too dumb to lie realistically, but they do it anyway. If you define a "megachurch" as any (Protestant) church having 2000 or more members, that's the equivalent of 150 megachurches just for Jeffy's converts alone. Neither the megachurches, nor the converts, exist.
 

Twisted

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Click on the Practical Bible Baptist College link and then on "Jeff Owens Full Story" and you get this statement:
"Dr. Owens and his wife, Schery (also a Bible college graduate) have been successfully married for 39 years.
No mention of his wife cheating on him?
 

illinoisguy

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No, there is no mention of any such marital difficulties, but if such did happen, that would be covered by the mention that "he and his family have undergone many attacks from the devil" and it's nice to know that all his family members, including his son Jeremiah who pleaded guilty to sexual abuse, "have stayed true to their old-time beliefs and have continued to love God and others," and are still "faithfully attending church and serving God with their lives to this day." [I'm just quoting from their web site]. I would say that Dr. Owens' college has a good Public Relations man who knows how to write good copy that promotes the college and puts all the skeletons in their closet in the best possible light. I just wish that former IFB lay people who lived good moral lives, and were booted out of their churches for lesser offenses, such as insufficient loyalty to the preacher, could get such good press and commendations, instead of being branded as infidels and consigned to the outer darkness where there is wailing and gnashing of teeth.
 

ALAYMAN

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I am not defending any of the easy believism that is promoted, nor the cover-ups that is alleged with my reply so please don't think that I am stating that you should cover up irregularities and proprieties or sin by what I'm about to say. I'm only giving another perspective for consideration.

I was a young blossoming fundamentalist when I heard a sermon, no, a series of sermons by Jeff Owens that really fired me up. One of them was a sermon titled "Don't go to hell from [fill in the blank]". The "rip your face off" style of preaching that accompanied much of his homiletical approach has long since left my appeal, but that message still looms extremely large in my mind. The essence of it was whether you're a deacon's kid, a preacher's kid, singing in the college tour group, or any other position of supposed prestige, don't let such man-made self-righteousness send you to hell. At the time I was a budding up-and-comer in my church and the temptation to let such pride creep in was worthy of taking note. When I had a son shortly after hearing that message it made a profound impact on how I always let him know that being a Christian had nothing to do with his church affiliation or his daddy's beliefs. Again, it had a profound impact upon my thinking and I am grateful.
To make that story more poignant, he spoke at our church. After the meetings I had an opportunity to be with him personally to take him on his way to the next meeting. In speaking with him I asked him about an issue that I had grappled with a little bit at that moment of my very young naive fundamentalist formation. I asked him about the controversial topic "pants on women". I did not ask him that question to be provocative, but out of sincere desire to know what the scriptures taught and how to deal with it in relationship to my marriage. His words ring crystal clear in my ears still to this very day, some nearly 20 years later. He said ALAYMAN, well he really didn't call me that 😁. He said "Chris, did your wife marry a fundamentalist when she said I do. Then since she didn't I wouldn't worry about these issues and I would work on the basics of making my wife happy". Words of impeccable wisdom yet came from somebody who firmly believed in all of the 'old path fundamentals" but spoken to a young impressionable forming christian. I could tell a few other stories like that from people who I know personally were mentored by him but I'll leave it there and say that we ought to consider the totality of the nuances of these kinds of discussions before we cast judgments. I'm not using my personal anecdotal evidence to Trump other people's opinions, merely trying to add to the layers of complexity.
 

tmjbog

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I am not defending any of the easy believism that is promoted, nor the cover-ups that is alleged with my reply so please don't think that I am stating that you should cover up irregularities and proprieties or sin by what I'm about to say. I'm only giving another perspective for consideration.

I was a young blossoming fundamentalist when I heard a sermon, no, a series of sermons by Jeff Owens that really fired me up. One of them was a sermon titled "Don't go to hell from [fill in the blank]". The "rip your face off" style of preaching that accompanied much of his homiletical approach has long since left my appeal, but that message still looms extremely large in my mind. The essence of it was whether you're a deacon's kid, a preacher's kid, singing in the college tour group, or any other position of supposed prestige, don't let such man-made self-righteousness send you to hell. At the time I was a budding up-and-comer in my church and the temptation to let such pride creep in was worthy of taking note. When I had a son shortly after hearing that message it made a profound impact on how I always let him know that being a Christian had nothing to do with his church affiliation or his daddy's beliefs. Again, it had a profound impact upon my thinking and I am grateful.
To make that story more poignant, he spoke at our church. After the meetings I had an opportunity to be with him personally to take him on his way to the next meeting. In speaking with him I asked him about an issue that I had grappled with a little bit at that moment of my very young naive fundamentalist formation. I asked him about the controversial topic "pants on women". I did not ask him that question to be provocative, but out of sincere desire to know what the scriptures taught and how to deal with it in relationship to my marriage. His words ring crystal clear in my ears still to this very day, some nearly 20 years later. He said ALAYMAN, well he really didn't call me that 😁. He said "Chris, did your wife marry a fundamentalist when she said I do. Then since she didn't I wouldn't worry about these issues and I would work on the basics of making my wife happy". Words of impeccable wisdom yet came from somebody who firmly believed in all of the 'old path fundamentals" but spoken to a young impressionable forming christian. I could tell a few other stories like that from people who I know personally were mentored by him but I'll leave it there and say that we ought to consider the totality of the nuances of these kinds of discussions before we cast judgments. I'm not using my personal anecdotal evidence to Trump other people's opinions, merely trying to add to the layers of complexity.
Other than covering up some things there really isn't a lot that you could directly blame Jeff for at his former church. Most of the big issues that led his demise were things his family members did.
 
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